What is Spectrum ?

Wimax Spectrum - The 802.16 specification applies across a wide swath of the Radio Frequency spectrum, and WiMAX could function on any frequency below 10GHz, (higher frequencies would decrease the range of a Base Station to a few hundred meters in an urban environment). There is no uniform global licensed spectrum for WiMAX, although the WiMAX Forum has published three licensed spectrum profiles: 2.3GHz, 2.5GHz and 3.5GHz, in an effort to decrease cost: economies of scale dictate that the more WiMAX embedded devices (such as mobile phones and WiMAX-embedded laptops) are produced, the lower the unit cost. (The two highest cost components of producing a mobile phone are the silicon and the extra radio needed for each band.)

Similar economy of scale benefits apply to the production of Base Stations. In the unlicensed band, 5.x GHz is the approved profile. Telecom companies are unlikely to use this spectrum widely other than for backhaul, as they do not own and control the spectrum. In the USA, the biggest segment available is around 2.5 GHz, and is already assigned, primarily to Sprint Nextel and Clearwire.

Elsewhere in the world, the most-likely bands used will be the Forum approved ones, with 2.3 GHz probably being most important in Asia. Some countries in Asia like India, Vietnam and Indonesia will use a mix of 3.3 GHz and other frequencies. Analogue TV bands (700MHz) may become available for WiMAX use, but await the complete rollout of digital TV, and there will be other uses suggested for that spectrum.

EU commissioner Viviane Reding has suggested re-allocation of 500-800 MHz spectrum for wireless communication, including WiMAX. WiMAX profiles define channel size, TDD/FDD and other necessary attributes in order to have inter-operating products. The current fixed profiles are defined for both TDD and FDD profiles. At this point, all of the mobile profiles are TDD only. The fixed profiles have channel sizes of 3.5 MHz, 5 MHz, 7 MHz and 10 MHz. The mobile profiles are 5 MHz, 8.75 MHz and 10 MHz. (Note: the 802.16 standard allows a far wider variety of channels, but only the above subsets are supported as WiMAX profiles.)

One of the significant advantages of advanced wireless systems such as WiMAX is spectral efficiency. For example, 802.16-2004 (fixed) has a spectral efficiency of 3.7 bit/s/Hertz, and other 3.5-4G wireless systems offer spectral efficiencies that are similar to within a few tenths of a percent. The notable advantage of WiMAX comes from combining SOFDMA with smart antenna technologies.

This multiplies the effective spectral efficiency through multiple reuse and smart network deployment topologies. The direct use of frequency domain organization simplifies designs using MIMO-AAS compared to CDMA/WCDMA methods, resulting in more-effective systems.

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